Azure NSG Integration with Storage and Other Services

Network Security Groups (NSGs) are a critical component in Azure networking which enable the flow of traffic to controlled both within the virtual network, i.e. between subnets (and even VMs), and external to the virtual network, i.e. Internet, other parts of known IP space (such as an ExpressRoute connected site) and Azure components such as load balancers. Rules are grouped into NSGs and applied to subnets (and sometimes vNICs however its easier management to apply at the subnet level). Rules are based on:

  • Source IP range
  • Destination IP range
  • Source port(s)
  • Destination port(s)
  • Protocol
  • Allow/Deny
  • Priority

In place of the IP ranges certain tags can be used such as VirtualNetwork (known IP space which includes IP spaces connected to the virtual network, e.g. an on-premises IP space connected via ExpressRoute), Internet (not known IP space) and AzureLoadBalancer. Additionally through the use of service tags other Azure services can be included in rules which include the IP ranges of certain services for example Storage, SQL and AzureTrafficManager. It is also possible to limit these to specific regions for the service, for example Storage.EastUS as the service tag to enable access only to Storage in EastUS. This could then be used in a rule instead of an IP range. This is very beneficial as now you can enable only specific machines in a specific subnet to communicate to specific services in specific regions. Without this functionality you would have to try and create rules based on the public IP addresses each service used. More information on service tags can be found at

Another useful feature is application security groups. Using application security groups you can create a number of groups for the various types of application tiers you have (using New-AzureRmApplicationSecurityGroup), use them in NSG rules (e.g. -DestinationApplicationSecurityGroupId) and then you assign a network interface for a VM to be part of a specific application security group (using the ApplicationSecurityGroup parameter at creation time). Now you don’t have to worry about the actual IP address or subnet of the VM in the NSG rules. The NIC is now part of the application security group and will automatically have the rules applied based on that membership. Imagine you created an application security group for all the VMs in a certain tier of the application and they would all automatically have the correct rules regardless of their IP address or subnet membership.

On the other side of the equation you have Azure services like Storage and SQL and by default they have public facing endpoints. While there are some ACLs to limit access it can be very difficult/impossible to try and restrict them to only specific Azure IaaS VMs in your environment. For example you may have a storage account or Azure SQL database instance you only want to be accessible from VMs in a specific subnet in a virtual network. This is now possible through a combination of service endpoints and the Azure service firewall capability.

Firstly on the virtual network, service endpoints are enabled for specific services (e.g. Storage) for specific subnets. This now makes that subnet available as part of the firewall configuration for that target service.(note that if you skip this step it can be done automatically when performing the configuration on the actual service!).

Next on the actual service (which must be in the same region as the virtual network) select the ‘Firewalls and virtual networks’ option, change the ‘Allow access from’ to ‘Selected networks’, ‘add existing virtual network’, select the virtual network and subnets and click Add and then Save. Now the service will only be available to the selected virtual subnets.

When you put all these various features together there are now great controls available between VMs in virtual networks and key Azure services to really help lock down access in a simple way.

More information on service endpoints can be found at

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